Wednesday, 30 September 2015

BOOK REVIEW: Fans of the Impossible Life by Katie Scelsa

Title: Fans of the Impossible Life
Author: Katie Scelsa
Publisher: Balzer + Bray
Release Date: September 8th 2015

Synopsis: Mira is starting over at Saint Francis Prep. She promised her parents she would at least try to pretend that she could act like a functioning human this time, not a girl who can’t get out of bed for days on end, who only feels awake when she’s with Sebby.

Jeremy is the painfully shy art nerd at Saint Francis who’s been in self-imposed isolation after an incident that ruined his last year of school. When he sees Sebby for the first time across the school lawn, it’s as if he’s been expecting this blond, lanky boy with mischief glinting in his eye.
Sebby, Mira’s gay best friend, is a boy who seems to carry sunlight around with him. Even as life in his foster home starts to take its toll, Sebby and Mira together craft a world of magic rituals and impromptu road trips, designed to fix the broken parts of their lives.
As Jeremy finds himself drawn into Sebby and Mira’s world, he begins to understand the secrets that they hide in order to protect themselves, to keep each other safe from those who don’t understand their quest to live for the impossible.

*This book was sent to me in exchange for an honest review.

1.5/5 stars

This book was advertised as a bisexual love triangle, but unfortunately there was no mention of bisexuality, or an actual love triangle. That was the main reason why this book interested me, so that was a big let down.

I wanted to love this book so much, but in the end I was so frustrated with it. First off the writing style - it was told in three points of views. First person, second person and third person. This type of writing style didn't appeal to me, but it also didn't add anything to the story. I would have much preferred it in all third person, or each of the characters in 1st person.

This book deals with different types of mental illnesses and disorders including - depression, self-harm, suicidal thoughts, drug and alcohol use. I felt like these issues weren't handled in such an honest way. The characters in the beginning of the story were likeable, funny, had a little more dept and personality, but by the end they were left quite dry. I was holding on to see if they would develop, but very little happened. That was something this book desperately needed. 

I'm so disappointed that I didnt connect at all with anyone, which lead me to not feel anything for the love story/friendships in this book.

I also wanted to add that there were a few scenes in particular that made me so uncomfortable to read, and rubbed me the wrong way. Additionally, the relationship these characters have with their young and "hip" teacher, which was absolutely wrong on so many levels. It could have been handled more accurately, and less unusual.

Nonetheless, this book has a ton of diversity which we don't get to see a lot in young adult contemporary. I appreciate all the author tackled in one book, but unfortunately it wasn't a story that delivered. 


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